Seasons of Napa

When is the best time to visit Napa Valley? For us the answer is year round! We’ve visited wine country in January, May, June, July, August, September, and December. February is pending – stay tuned! Consider a decent amount of the legwork done. Now you can sit back, pour some vino, read along, and plan your visit!

May – June

Photo taken at Round Pond Estate

Lets start with May/June. We took an extra day off work for a total of 4 days/3 nights (Fri – Mon) and visited over the long holiday weekend in honor of Memorial Day. Originally our plan was to hit BottleRock – a music festival with gourmet food & wine. I got us plane tickets and waited to book a hotel until all of the ideal spots were flashing no vacancy signs (womp womp). This weekend is probably one of the biggest for Napa Valley. We couldn’t find a reasonably priced hotel within county lines, so we decided to forgo the show, sell our festival tickets, and book a swanky hotel on a vineyard. Thankful that we did! Festivals are always a good time, but we knew the wine country FOMO would’ve kicked in. On Friday we experienced a little bit of “May Gray” and some sprinkles. It was definitely sweater weather on day 1, but that was the only day we tasted indoors. The sun was out for the rest of the weekend and skies alternated between slightly cloudy and bright. Definitely not pool party weather yet, but perfect for the “jacuzz.” If you decide to come up this weekend, be sure to make a few reservations ahead of time. I would say book 60% and leave 40% open in regards to winery visits. As for restaurants, make a resi every night!

Wondering what type of clothes to pack? I wore a slouchy sweater and leggings + booties on Friday, a long sleeve romper + mules on Saturday, and a midi length off the shoulder dress + mules on Sunday. My hubs wore a light sweater and chinos on Fri, a button up with shorts on Sat, and a button up (sleeves rolled up) with pants on Sun.

What’s happening with the vines? Spring Flowering! Buds are beginning to blossom and grow.

July

Photo taken at Far Niente Winery’s
2018 Chardonnay Celebration

Next up is July. We spent Fourth of July weekend 2017 in Napa and loved it! It’s always sunny, no chance of showers, it’s moderately crowded (aka more people to chat with) and everyone is happy. It’s also warm. Very warm. You can expect AC in every tasting room and chilled bottles which really helps with the heat! It’s a bit crowded this time of year, so our recommendation is to book 80% and leave 20% open for tastings. Also, follow suit with May/June and book your dinner reservations! Last year we re-visited Napa in mid-July for an event at Far Niente and Nickel & Nickel. Talk about a perfect weekend. Sunny skies and warm breezes call for flowy dresses and chardonnay! After a day of wine tasting, we’d return to the hotel and swim a few laps in the pool before getting ready for a night out. Highly recommend a July trip if you love tasting wine in the sun!

What’s happening with the vines? Summer Veraison! All varietals are born green. The veraison process is when color takes form – changing from green to yellow, purple, red, etc. Also growers will walk the vineyards and chop off extra bunches that don’t look promising. This leaves elbow room for the MVPs!

August – September

Photo taken at SENZA Hotel located next to Ashes & Diamonds Vineyard

Do it. No questions asked. This time of the year is magical! Fall Harvest has begun in some parts and the fruit is ripe for picking! This means green bushy vines are all around and it truly is a wine lovers paradise. If there’s ever a time to book a full vineyard tour + wine tasting, this is it. Napa gets pretty crowded in September because of harvest season, but early in the month is a great option. We visited over Labor Day weekend and caught nothing but sunny skies and warm temps. Hotels are at peak price, however if you’re planning well enough in advance we suggest looking into an Airbnb somewhere close to vineyards in Saint Helena. Plan and book 90% of your winery visits and leave 10% open for recommendations & pop-ins. This might be on the conservative side, but like I mentioned it’s a popular season and we don’t want anyone to miss out on visiting their faves due to unpreparedness! Definitely make your dinner reservations ahead of time as well.

What’s happening with the vines? Fall Harvest! Grapes are fully ripened and sugar levels rise. Growers select crème de la crème!

December – January

Photo Taken at Frog’s Leap Winery

We love Napa in the wintertime for several reasons. Hotel pricing is great, we stock up on wine for the holidays, crowds are small, we love the weather, and walk-ins are feasible. Being from sunny San Diego, we don’t experience a whole lot of cold. Napa in winter is very chilly/brisk, but can still be sunny and cozy. Be prepared to bundle up by a fire and/or under a blanket for relaxation with vino in hand. Small to no crowds provide opportunities for more conversation with your host and we love this! The folks pouring your wine are subject matter experts and vino enthusiasts – so if you get the chance make sure to converse and ask questions! Our last few visits have all extended past the allotted time because we were carried away by extra pours and great company! We recently rang in the New Year in Napa and plan to spend as many NYEs as we can here. It was perfection. Quaint, festive, and full of quality wine + champagne. Wineries are open on NYE, but close early. A vast majority will be closed on NYD as well with the exception of a few bigger guys (list of open wineries coming soon). We slept in on New Years Day, enjoyed brunch at Farmstead, and took Walter on a short hike to an off-leash dog park at Alston Park which is surrounded by rolling hills and vines (a great recommendation from the staff at Farmstead). It was perfect hiking weather! Sunny and clear skies with a cool breeze.

What’s happening with the vines? Winter pruning! This part of maintaining a vineyard is very important. Growers will determine which vines are most viable for harvesting in the upcoming year and care for them accordingly. Also there’s something to be said for seeing vines in the winter. It represents hard-working people and seasons changing, while reminding us to let go of the old and make room for new growth.

Thanks for sipping with us,

The Social Grapes

IG: @smashleythegrape

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